Why Celiacs Need Bone Broth

Ask any adult Celiac who was diagnosed as a child and they’ll tell you, your healing journey is not just about eliminating gluten.  When your immune system isn’t working correctly, you are prone to collecting a host of other autoimmune diseases as you get older, for example, colitis, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, or allergies.

Bone broth may sound like another “fad” to many people, but it’s not—it’s a traditional medicinal food that we’ve neglected for decades as we clung to antibiotics to cure us. For Celiacs and others with autoimmune diseases, adding bone broth as a regular and frequent part of your diet can be extremely helpful. It helps to calm and heal your intestinal lining and provides minerals and other nutrients in an easy-to-absorb form. It really does help you fight off viruses, and it promotes a sense of calm (thank glycine for that).

My daughter and I have multiple food intolerances and allergies (our allergies manifest in GI and skin symptoms, not anaphylaxis), and when we are experiencing any gut distress, we immediately reach for bone broth. We also have a cup at breakfast several days a week. For us, staying away from the plethora of foods that trigger us is REALLY hard. There have been times when there were only six-to-eight foods that we could eat without getting a stomachache.  We’ve found the key to sticking to such a restrictive diet is to have easy convenient “go to” food around that makes you happy.

For us, that “go to” is bone broth.  True, it doesn’t provide crunch but you could add some rice crackers for that.  The key is in the making. It’s not hard, you just need ingredients, sequencing and time. If you are nervous about leaving the stove on, do it in a crockpot.

  1. You can use a whole chicken cut into parts but I like to roast a chicken for dinner and use the leftover bones. Hopefully, you’ll also have the back, gizzards and neck (cut the neck into pieces) that you can add as well. If you can, use organic chicken bones and at least 2 chicken feet. The feet help the gelatin form, which is very nourishing.
  2. Soak the room temperature or cold bones in cold water and vinegar (a couple of tablespoons) for 30-60 minutes so the vinegar can penetrate the bones and extract the minerals.
  3. Cook for 12-72 hours, feel free to toss in a couple of chopped carrots, celery and an onion. The longer you cook it, the richer the broth.
  4. Add a bunch of parsley in during the last 10 minutes to form mineral ions.
  5. Reuse your bones to make a second pot of broth. Since it will be thinner, reduce it to get the same richness as the first pot.
Helps heal and seal your gut, and promotes healthy digestion: The gelatin found in bone broth is a hydrophilic colloid. It attracts and holds liquids, including digestive juices, thereby supporting proper digestion Inhibits infection caused by cold and flu viruses, etc.: A study4published over a decade ago found that chicken soup indeed has medicinal qualities, significantly mitigating infection
Reduces joint pain and inflammation, courtesy of chondroitin sulphates, glucosamine, and other compounds extracted from the boiled down cartilage Fights inflammation: Amino acids such as glycine, proline, and arginine all have anti-inflammatory effects. Arginine, for example, has been found to be particularly beneficial for the treatment of sepsis5 (whole-body inflammation).

Glycine also has calming effects, which may help you sleep better

Promotes strong, healthy bones: As mentioned above, bone broth contains high amounts of calcium, magnesium, and other nutrients that play an important role in healthy bone formation Promotes healthy hair and nail growth, thanks to the gelatin in the broth

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s